From the Archives ...

Sea runners - Early Season Excitement - Christopher Bassano

Presented from Issue 100
Considering the world class quality of our sea trout fishery, these fish are not sought after by enough anglers. Sea runners live in the salt water and run up our estuaries and rivers from the start of August to the middle of November. At this time of the year, they are here to eat the many species of fish that are either running up the rivers to spawn or are living in and around the estuary systems. Trout, both sea run and resident (Slob Trout) feed heavily on these small fish which darken in colouration as they move further into fresh water reaches.

The majority of these predatory fish are brown trout with rainbows making up a very small percentage of the catch. They can be found all around the state but it would be fair to say that the east coast is the least prolific of all the areas. They still run up such rivers as the Georges (and many others) but their numbers along with the quality of the fishing elsewhere make it difficult to recommend the area above the larger northern, southern and western rivers.

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Opening of the Rock Lobster Season

A big weekend coming up. For extra support, Fishcare Volunteers for rock lobster opening weekend on the East Coast.
Volunteers will be at Burns Bay ramp, with a hot cuppa brewing for early starters and answer any questions fishers may have.

 

Rock Lobster Fishery Re-opening

The recreational and commercial rock lobster fisheries in the Maria Island Biotoxin Zone re-opened from 00:01 on Saturday, 19 July 2014. This means there are no paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) closures in place on the east coast for rock lobster. The results of rock lobster sampled from the Maria Island Biotoxin zone have shown PST levels below the regulatory limit. The standing Public Health Alert from the Department of Health and Human Services recommending that people discard rock lobster gut remains in place.

Rock Lobster Opening Dates 2013

Hi Mike
We are getting quite a few enquiries about the various rock lobster season opening dates and whether fishers can transit between open and closed areas.  I’ve attached a flyer here. The information is also on the DPIPWE website at:

East Coast Rock Lobster Fishery re-opens from 9 February

The recreational and commercial rock lobster fisheries closed due to a toxic algae event will re-open on 7.00am, Saturday 9 February 2013. That is, all waters currently closed from St Helens Point south to Marion Bay will re-open.
Rock lobster fishers returning to the re-opened waters this weekend may set pots and rings or take lobster by diving from 7.00am. More details are now available on the Emergency Fishery Closures webpage at www.fishing.tas.gov.au

Rock Lobster Review Outcomes

The new rock lobster management plan has now been released meaning new rock lobster rules apply for this recreational season which opens on Saturday, 5th November.
The main changes are the division of state fishing waters into the Eastern and Western Rock Lobster Fishing Regions and a reduced bag limit in the Eastern Region of 3 rock lobsters per day with an on-water possession limit of 6 for multiple day trips.  Other changes include new on-water boat limits and reduced possession limits for non-fishers.

Rock Lobster Fishery Draft Management Plan

Summary of Proposed Changes – April 2011
A draft management plan has been prepared for the rock lobster fishery. The table below summarises the proposed rule changes. Public comment is now invited on these proposals. Please click on this link for full details.

Rock Lobster Plan - Some thoughts

The rock lobster fishery is in decline. The biomass has reduced and is still in decline. The total catch must be reduced to allow the biomass to rise.

There is real thought amongst recreational fishers that Government, and more particularly the fisheries department does no more than give recreational fishers lip service.

Rock Lobster Plan - Some thoughts

The rock lobster fishery is in decline. The biomass has reduced and is still in decline. The total catch must be reduced to allow the biomass to rise.

There is real thought amongst recreational fishers that Government, and more particularly the fisheries department does no more than give recreational fishers lip service.

A Socio-Economic Assessment of the Tasmanian Recreational Rock Lobster Fishery

S. Frijlink & J.M. Lyle
A self-administered mail questionnaire was used to collect social and economic data from Tasmanian rock lobster licence holders. Questions pertained to fisher's demographic characteristics, fishing participation patterns and preferences, fishing attitudes and experience preferences, and expenditure relating to rock lobster fishing.

Please take the time to read this report (click here) . It is 75 pages long and about 716kb.

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