From the Archives ...

Squid great to eat great for bait

Phil Ellerton takes a look at a member of the Cephalopod family - the squid.

Tasmania has two main squid - calamari and arrowhead. The tubes of both of these are excellent fare when eaten fresh, while the tentacles can be frozen for bait. As bait there is little better to entice many saltwater species.

Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Please check all relevant authorities before fishing.
htttp://www.ifs.tas.gov.au and http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/sea-fishing-aquaculture/recreational-fishing
Don't forget http://issuu.com/stevenspublishing for years of back issues !

Presented from Issue 96
Late summer brings to the fore the best of fly fishing in Tasmania, the regularity of hatches and falls of terrestrial insects makes dry fly fishing at times spectacular. These days are highlights and can be predicted with some regularity, however along with the highs you also get the lows, those ‘dog days’ where the trout simply don’t want to play. It could be they are too well fed or more sensitive to changes in the weather, or in fact simply will not feed until the hatch they can predict better than us arrives.

How to predict where the fishing will be good is a key to success at this time of year particularly if you want the fish a particular style of fly fishing. When fish do start to feed make the most of the opportunities as in high summer with warm water these ‘hot bites’ may well only last a short time.

96 four springs 01Presented from Issue 96
For the avid fly fisherman, Four Springs Lake is a pretty good option in the warm weather. Close to Launceston and super convenient for that after work trip. But ask any lure fisherman what Four Springs fishes like in the summer and you will probably get a reply consisting of something like “…the weed is really bad – it’s not worth the trip.” I think the first part of this answer is totally correct. It is a well-known fact that underwater weed growth increases with warmer water temperatures. Casting lures becomes difficult and trolling is near impossible. Weed every cast – definitely not anyone’s cup of tea.

96 leatherjacket 01Presented from Issue 96
It is unlikely that if you mention you caught a ‘Leatherjacket’ to any Tasmanian salt water angler that they won’t know what you are talking about. The humble old leatherjacket, often called jackets, butterfish, triggerfish and my favourite “Larry” (Larry the Leatherjacket) is probably one of the most common fish available in Tasmanian waters, both estuarine and oceanic.

96 bream lagoons bream

Presented from Issue 96
Look and Learn

As I passed Wrinklers lagoon I noticed for the first time this summer the lagoon had been released. The spoil piles still remained where the excavator had dug an opening to the sea, slowly being eroded by the ever widening channel as my favourite lagoon disgorged its tannin rich waters. My mind started racing with questions. How had the high water levels of winter and spring affected the fishing? Would the large bream from the year before still be there? How would the abundance of water birds affect the fishing? As the water level dropped and the flats began to appear, it became evident that the black inky mud of the year before had been overlaid by clean yellow sand and the lagoon now contained far more weed. How would this affect things? There is really only one way to find out.

Presented from Issue 96

Why Do it?

Mako Sharks are a fantastic sports fish and as luck would have it, they live right here in Tasmania. They are visually spectacular during the extremely hard fight as they rip line from the reel on one of their blistering runs and then up the entertainment value one more notch by leaping metres into the air, crashing back down with a huge spray of water.

Honda marine 0Honda Marine, a division of American Honda Motor Co., Ltd breaks the mould for marine engines at the 2017 Miami International Boat Show with a bold new concept engine that could power the future of boating. With inspiration from across Honda’s line-up – including automotive, marine and aeronautical – the design concept engine is a blue sky vision for what future marine engines could look like.

“The Honda Marine Design Concept Engine is a clear indicator that Honda is committed to the Marine business, continuing its legacy of innovation and ground-breaking marine products with a vision of what future Honda Marine power could be,” said Will Walton, Assistant Vice President – Honda Marine America.

Designers at Honda’s Advanced Design Group in the U.S were given a ‘clean sheet of paper’ opportunity to design a concept motor that could be applied to a variety of engines.

scientific anglersWe have just received the below update from Scientific Anglers concerning further testing on the new AST Plus slickness additive. These figures are quite incredible and can truly be said that the AST Plus is a game changer in the manufacturing of fly lines.

When you read these figures the new Amplitude fly lines are the best value fly lines on the market.

Presented from Issue 95
Recent kayak popularity It was over 25 years, maybe 30 years ago, when I first saw someone fishing from water level in a boat. On a dark and windy night much to my amusement my mate John Rumph waddled into Lake Toolondo in the Grampians on a horrid night standing in what I think was the first ever float tube imported into Australia.

Presented from Issue 95
Huntsman Lake lies approximately 20 km south of Deloraine. It’s an easy, scenic drive via the small town of Meander. As most anglers know, the lake is only a few years old. It was formed in 2007 with the construction of the Meander Dam. The lake is fed by the Meander River and also by several small streams.

Presented from Issue 95
These days fishing techniques and fishing tackle just keep making more advances and becoming much more technical. I know I have fallen into that trap myself. I’ve just added a GPS to my arsenal, so that I can mark waypoints for hotspots. I also have a fish finder installed. Some kayakers even have high end fish finders with dual beam, side imaging, big colour screens and inbuilt GPS. The same kind of set up you’d see on a well laid out bream or trout boat.

Presented from Issue 95
The tip of dorsal fin momentarily cut the glassy surface of the lagoon followed by a slight swirl over the iseotes weed mound. This was the signal I had been waiting for, he was back. An accurate long cast placed the little Montana Nymph a few feet ahead of the slight ripple caused by this activity. This was met by a huge bow wave and swirl in the vicinity of the fly.

95 buzzerPresented from Issue 95
I do not want to sound all flowery and fluffy, but some of my recent fishing on Tasmania’s superb streams where the little birds flutter about at rod’s length and the caddis are like snowflakes hovering in the clouds all excites me. What must it do to the trout? There are, of course, many insects on these small streams, the main one at this time of year is the mayfly. But the eager trout are mostly happy to take almost anything you may present to them on the shallow bubbly waters. A little Red Tag size fourteen or a Deer Hair Caddis work well. Where the waters have some depth, my personal choice is a small wet, a nymph, beetle or stick caddis.

Presented from Issue 95
I think just about everyone has used, or have at least heard of the word ‘munter’ once or twice in recent times. So, what is a ‘munter’ you ask? I think everyone has their own little word for a trophy sized brown, brook or rainbow trout, I guess it all depends on where you’re from. For me, the word ‘munter’ applies for something big, something special, that fish you’ve been looking for a very long time. If anywhere in Tasmania, the Arthur River, or any west coast river or lake, is a likely place to find one of these large, much desired fish. On the 23rd of October, I was lucky enough to have finally caught one of these large fish, a true, wild ‘munter’.

Presented from Issue 95
The Dorset River is a magic little stream that flows through Pera Flats at the foot of Mount Paris situated on the northeast corner of Tasmania near the town of Ringarooma. The “Dorset” is just one of the tributaries that flows into the very productive Ringarooma River. This small stream meanders its way down through a mix of farmland and native forest that generates all kinds of land based trout food which inevitably finds its way into the river for an opportunistic brown trout. When you add to this the ongoing aquatic lifecycles of a small stream and the competition for food amongst the fish that inhabit it, the trout become very willing to take a variety of well presented flies, lures or baits with this being one of the great attractions of fishing small streams such as this in Tasmania.

Presented from Issue 95

Over the last few years there has been many new frontiers that anglers have been faced with in the fishing world, there has been more changes to the way we fish, tackle we use and techniques we deploy than probably any other decade and as anglers we at times become enveloped in whatever new technique, lure or tackle happens to be the next big thing or “Revolution” in fishing. With information highways at our finger tips, social media everywhere we look, more fishing based television and media than ever before the amount of information available to the every day angler can be overwhelming and sometimes confusing.

Presented from Issue 95
Snap weight trolling was developed in North America for targeting suspended or structure hugging walleyes. To successfully target suspended or bottom hugging fish, no matter what species, requires a special presentation of your lure or bait. Downriggers are without doubt the best tool for precise presentations at depth, but can be a costly exercise if you are trolling in snag infested water, and you hang up your bomb on a submerged tree or rock. A snap weight line can easily be run in conjunction with a leadcore line, flat lines or downriggers. In addition, snap weight lines are perfect as planer board lines with either in line boards or double trolling boards, but let’s not worry about them here. The snap weight technique will prove a valuable asset for any dedicated troller as it will allow you to troll more deep lines without a downrigger or leadcore line. Places like Arthurs in deeper water, Great Lake, Dee Lagoon, Barrington and all the West coast waters are ideal for this technique.

Presented from Issue 95
I am lucky enough at the moment to be working a two weeks on, one week off roster. When I switched over to this roster I decided it was time for some midweek trips to places I have not fished a lot in the last few years.

A couple of years back whilst involved in the making of the fly fishing movie The Source Tasmania I had the opportunity to meet some champion blokes. Chris Reygaert flew over from Western Australia to help his brother, film maker Nick and he stayed at my house for a week or so. He ended up moving back to Tasmania to live a short time later, and we have become good mates. I love nothing more than spending a day on the water with Chris. He is a very accomplished fly angler and has a brilliant eye for a great photo, which is something I am becoming more passionate about with every fishing trip.

NRM South and the Derwent Estuary Program have joined forces to initiate the development of a ‘River Derwent Plan’, which will examine security and improvement of water resources in the Derwent Catchment.

We are seeking your input. What do you value most about the Derwent River and its tributaries? What are your concerns for water quality and water security now and into the future ? What actions are needed to manage this waterway? Please join us to share your thoughts:

16 January 2017

The library in Charles St, New Norfolk, 7.00 —9.00 pm, includes refreshments

RSVP 13 January to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tas Maritime Radio (TMR) has now commissioned a new multi channel marine VHF base station to provide safety coverage to the highland lakes area. It will provide a 24/7 safety listening watch on VHF Channel 16 , the distress and calling channel, and from January 1st, will be used to transmit a daily weather sked for the area at 0830 hours after an initial announcement on CH16. The predicted coverage of the base will be Great Lake, Arthur’s Lake, Lake Echo, Lake Sorell, Lake Crescent, Penstock Lagoon, Woods Lake, Lagoon of Islands and Little Pine Lagoon – and probably more.

Place holder

2016 12 yamaha f90 aYamaha Motor Australia is excited to announce the release of the all new four-stroke 90 horsepower outboard engine, the new lightweight F90. This remarkable new engine bolsters Yamahas line up of class leading mid-range outboards from the award-winning F70 through to the top selling F130. The new F90 fills an important place within the Australian line up, delivering the perfect power option for the huge number of Aussie built boats rated to a maximum of 90 horsepower. Not only does this engine sit in a popular part of the market, it also delivers many new advantages that make F90 quite exceptional.

2016 12 yamaha f25 bYamaha Motor Australia is excited to announce the release of the highly-anticipated four-stroke, 25 horsepower outboard engine, the all-new lightweight F25 EFI. This fantastic addition to Yamaha’s four-stroke line up continues Yamaha’s proud tradition of producing exceptional small motors designed for durability, reliability and above all else, enjoyable time on the water. The new F25 is around 25% lighter and has been engineered for skippers who expect the very best in features, performance and efficiency from their small outboard.

The new F25 has been developed to exceed the performance and features of Yamaha’s 25N two-stroke, a motor that offered excellent performance and highly reliable operation that has powered Australian boaters for decades as well as improve on Yamaha’s existing F25. The all-new F25 has achieved all this and more. Its four-stroke, fuel injected design delivers even better performance and the kind of fuel economy that makes small boating affordable and extremely satisfying.

Go to top
JSN Boot template designed by JoomlaShine.com