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Saltwater shore bashing

The Christmas season is now upon us, many anglers will begin to pursue popular inshore species such as East Australian Salmon, Silver Trevally, Black Bream and Sand Flathead. Fishing from the shore has been one of my favourite methods of targeting specific species of fish for some time now and the very thought of discovering a new location is enough for me leave the boat at home. With Georges Bay and some North West hot spots being my favourite places to fish, many other destinations have either been discovered or successfully fished. Typical locations such as Red Rock on the North West coast has been producing many different species for a while now with the captures of good sized Silver Trevally, Gummy Sharks, Elephant Fish and Southern Garfish becoming more common. Some people worry and stress about not being able to access a kayak or boat in order to venture out onto the water but in reality, most anglers will have at least two great fishing spots that they can easily access from the shore.
When I began fishing from Red Rock on the North West coast with my good mate Jeremy Shaw, the possibility of encountering a Draughtboard Shark or Eagle Ray was enough to keep us coming back each weekend. Many days were spent fishing at Red Rock with colossal amounts of burley and junk food. Back then, captures of small East Australian Salmon and Sand Flathead were cherished and we never thought of leaving the rock for any reason other than the occasional trip out in the boat for a Mako Shark. During at least five years of fishing from Red Rock, we caught numerous and memorable fish including that of a rather large Seven Gilled Shark. It wasn’t until I began to seriously fish around the plentiful beaches and jetties of Georges Bay that I realized that fishing was the thing for me. Like the many hobbies that people enjoy, I got better at the sport and eventually became unstoppable. I believe that every angler needs to start off somewhere, land based fishing is a great way to begin the life long journey.Read more ...

When you have finished for the day, why not have a brag about the ones that didn't get away! Send Mike an article on your fishing (Click here for contact details), and we'll get it published here. Have fun fishing - tasfish.com

Opening of the Rock Lobster Season

A big weekend coming up. For extra support, Fishcare Volunteers for rock lobster opening weekend on the East Coast.
Volunteers will be at Burns Bay ramp, with a hot cuppa brewing for early starters and answer any questions fishers may have.

 

Rock Lobster Fishery Re-opening

The recreational and commercial rock lobster fisheries in the Maria Island Biotoxin Zone re-opened from 00:01 on Saturday, 19 July 2014. This means there are no paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) closures in place on the east coast for rock lobster. The results of rock lobster sampled from the Maria Island Biotoxin zone have shown PST levels below the regulatory limit. The standing Public Health Alert from the Department of Health and Human Services recommending that people discard rock lobster gut remains in place.

Rock Lobster Opening Dates 2013

Hi Mike
We are getting quite a few enquiries about the various rock lobster season opening dates and whether fishers can transit between open and closed areas.  I’ve attached a flyer here. The information is also on the DPIPWE website at:

East Coast Rock Lobster Fishery re-opens from 9 February

The recreational and commercial rock lobster fisheries closed due to a toxic algae event will re-open on 7.00am, Saturday 9 February 2013. That is, all waters currently closed from St Helens Point south to Marion Bay will re-open.
Rock lobster fishers returning to the re-opened waters this weekend may set pots and rings or take lobster by diving from 7.00am. More details are now available on the Emergency Fishery Closures webpage at www.fishing.tas.gov.au

Rock Lobster Review Outcomes

The new rock lobster management plan has now been released meaning new rock lobster rules apply for this recreational season which opens on Saturday, 5th November.
The main changes are the division of state fishing waters into the Eastern and Western Rock Lobster Fishing Regions and a reduced bag limit in the Eastern Region of 3 rock lobsters per day with an on-water possession limit of 6 for multiple day trips.  Other changes include new on-water boat limits and reduced possession limits for non-fishers.

Rock Lobster Fishery Draft Management Plan

Summary of Proposed Changes – April 2011
A draft management plan has been prepared for the rock lobster fishery. The table below summarises the proposed rule changes. Public comment is now invited on these proposals. Please click on this link for full details.

Rock Lobster Plan - Some thoughts

The rock lobster fishery is in decline. The biomass has reduced and is still in decline. The total catch must be reduced to allow the biomass to rise.

There is real thought amongst recreational fishers that Government, and more particularly the fisheries department does no more than give recreational fishers lip service.

Rock Lobster Plan - Some thoughts

The rock lobster fishery is in decline. The biomass has reduced and is still in decline. The total catch must be reduced to allow the biomass to rise.

There is real thought amongst recreational fishers that Government, and more particularly the fisheries department does no more than give recreational fishers lip service.

A Socio-Economic Assessment of the Tasmanian Recreational Rock Lobster Fishery

S. Frijlink & J.M. Lyle
A self-administered mail questionnaire was used to collect social and economic data from Tasmanian rock lobster licence holders. Questions pertained to fisher's demographic characteristics, fishing participation patterns and preferences, fishing attitudes and experience preferences, and expenditure relating to rock lobster fishing.

Please take the time to read this report (click here) . It is 75 pages long and about 716kb.

Rock Lobster Rules Review Update

Tasmanian Association for Recreational Fishing Inc

The Rock Lobster Management Plan Review commenced in April 2009 with the current set of rules in place until February 2011. Since the review commenced TARFish have been involved in meetings with the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DIPWE) and the Tasmanian Rock Lobster Fisherman’s Association (TRLFA), the commercial rock lobster fishers. The meetings have been to understand the issues the fishery faces and what measures may be required to ensure the rock lobster fishery is sustainable for all stakeholders into the future.

Rock Lobster discussion paper

Government plans to reduce recreational rock lobster catch Tasmanian fisheries managers have determined the Tasmanian rock lobster fishery is over fished. Around 92.5% of rock lobster taken is by commercial fishers and the remainder by recreational methods. The Government plans to reduce the daily recreational bag limit from 5 to 4, despite the recreational share NEVER having reached its limit. Please read the attached and if you are a recreational rock lobster fisher make sure you attend one of the meetings. The dates are in the attached paper. We will put up some of the important points and further opinions here before these meetings start.

Attached Paper

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